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New Hampshire roads are up to serving any trip by car

New Hampshire roads will take you to beaches, mountains, cities and towns, famous resorts and historic and tourist attractions. Traveling north, south, east and west, up, down and around will find you on state and local highways, blue routes and more to enjoy leisurely fall drives and warm summer journeys to discover the Monadnock region, the Dartmouth Lake Sunapee Region, and the White Mountains Region to the Canadian border. Drive up Mount Washington and get a bumper sticker that says you did. The Seacoast is nestled in the southeastern corner and very accessible by car and the Lakes Region in the central part of the state holds beautiful Lake Winnipesaukee circumnavigated in a clockwise direction stating at Alton in the south.

Auto Routes to the Merrimack Valley

Getting to the Merrimack Valley by Car

The Merrimack Valley is in the south central part of New Hampshire, with the Monadnock region to the west, the Seacoast Region to the east, Massachusetts to the south and the New Hampshire Lakes Region directly north.

I-93, I-89, and U.S. Route 3 pass through the region. It should be noted, however, that the best way to see the area is a slow, leisurely drive on New Hampshire's scenic state highways.

From Central and Western Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York and points south and west: Take I-91 north, through Massachusetts into Vermont. I-91 follows the New Hampshire - Vermont border, and intersects with I-89 near Lebanon. Take I-89 south through the Lakes region and into the Merrimack Valley.

From Eastern Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and points south and east: Take I-93 north through Massachusetts and into New Hampshire. This highway will take you directly into the Merrimack Valley.

From Northern New Hampshire, Northern Vermont and points north: I-93 is the most direct route, heading southward through the White Mountain area into the region.

I-93 runs through or near Pelham, Salem, Windham, Canobie Lake, Derry, Londonderry, Manchester, Bow, Concord, Loudon and Canterbury.

I-89 runs past Contoockoo, Hopkinton and Concord.

U.S. Route 3 heads north to south, through Nashua, Hudson, Merrimack, Bedford, Manchester, Hooksett, Suncook, and Concord.

U.S. Route 4 takes an east-west route, through Northwood, Epsom, Chichester, Concord and northward.

Auto Routes to the White Mountains

Getting to the White Mountains by Car

New Hampshire's most mountainous region is the White Mountains. It is bordered by the Great North Woods Region to the north, Vermont to the west, Maine to the east, and two New Hampshire regions to the south: The Lakes Region and the Dartmouth - Lake Sunapee region.

One major interstate, I-93 runs through the lower part of the region, while U.S. Route 3 runs all the way to the Canadian border. Some portions of the White Mountains, it should be noted, are quite remote.

From New York City, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, southern New Hampshire and points south: In Massachusetts, pick up I-93 or I-293 north. Take this into Manchester, NH where you will continue north on I-93 into the White Mountains.

From Maine and points east: U.S. Route 2 runs westward from Maine and crosses the New Hampshire border near Shelburne.

From Great NorthWoods and points north: Take U.S. Route 3 southward, which will take you through most of the region. From northern Vermont the most direct route is to take I-93 south into the Littleton area.

From Vermont and points west: Head northward in Vermont to either I-93 south, or U.S. Route 302 east.

I-93 and U.S. Route 3 run a parallel course, passing through Blair, Campton, Thornton, Lincoln, and into Franconia.

I-93 continues on past Bethlehem, Littleton and then into Vermont.

U.S. Route 3 moves northward through Twin Mountain, Whitefield, and then to the Great North Woods Region.

NH Route 25 runs along the border with Vermont, through or near Piermont, Haverhill, Woodsville and Monroe.

Along the western edge of the region, NH Route 16 takes a north/south route through Conway, Glen, Jackson, Gorham, Milan, and Errol.

U.S. Route 2 runs across the length of the region, east to west, passing through the towns of Lancaster, Jefferson, Randolph, Gorham and Shelburne.

Auto Routes to the Lakes Region

Getting to the Lakes Region by Car

New Hampshire's Lakes Region is in the central part of the state, with the Dartmouth region to the west, Maine to the east, the Merrimack Valley and Seacoast to the south, and the White Mountain region to the north.

I-93 passes through the western end of the region, and U.S. Route 3 is another faster road through the Lakes. It should be noted, however, that the best way to see the area is a slow, leisurely drive on New Hampshire's scenic state highways.

From Central and Western Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York and points south and west: Take I-91 north, through Massachusetts into Vermont. I-91 follows the New Hampshire - Vermont border, and intersects with I-89 at White River Junction, Vt., near Lebanon, N.H. Take I-89 south into the Lakes region.

From Eastern Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and points south and east: Take I-93 north through Massachusetts and into New Hampshire. This highway will take you through the Lakes Region.

From Northern New Hampshire, Northern Vermont and points north: I-93 is the most direct route, heading southward through the White Mountain area into the region.

I-93 travels through Northfield, Tilton, New Hampton and Holderness.

Lake Winnipesaukee can be circumnavigated in a clockwise direction stating at Alton in the south via State Routes 11, 25, 109, and 28. On this route you'll travel past Weirs Beach, Meredith, Center Harbor, Moultonboro, Melvin Village, and Wolfeboro.

NH Route 16 travels through Rochester, Farmington, Union, Wakefield, Ossipee, and Tamworth.

U.S. Route 3 runs through Franklin, Tilton, Laconia, and then up to Squam Lake.

From Franklin, Route 3A heads northward past Bristol, Bridgewater, Hebron and Plymouth.

Auto Routes to the Seacoast

Getting to the Seacoast by Car

New Hampshire's Seacoast is the state's smallest region, nestled in its southeastern corner. It is very close to both Boston, MA and Portland, ME, bounded on the south by Massachusetts, the north by Maine, and on the west by both the Merrimack Valley and the Lakes Region. Of course, the Atlantic Ocean sits right off the region's coastline.

Auto travelers will find this sliver of New Hampshire very accessible. I-95 runs directly through the easternmost part of the region, and U.S. Route 4 begins in Portsmouth and runs westward through southern New Hampshire into Vermont.

From New York City, Connecticut Rhode Island, Massachusetts and points south. Find your way to I-95 north. Travelers from Central and Western Massachusetts should take their quickest route to Boston. Take I-95 directly into Seacoast New Hampshire.

From Maine and points north and east. Take I-95 south into the Seacoast.

From Northern New Hampshire, Northern Vermont and points north: Take I-93 south into Concord. At Concord, pick up U.S. Route 4 east into the Seacoast region.

From Western New Hampshire, Vermont and points west: Take U.S. Route 4 east into the Seacoast.

I-95 is convenient to all the beaches and runs through Seabrook, Hampton Falls, Hampton, North Hampton, Rye and Portsmouth. U.S. Route 1 parallels the interstate even closer to the water, and closer still is Route 1A, which literally abuts the coastline.

Further inland, State Route 108 runs through Newton, Exeter, Stratham, Newmarket, Durham and Dover.

Auto Routes to the Dartmouth Lake Sunapee Region

Getting to the Dartmouth Region by Car

The Dartmouth - Lake Sunapee Region of New Hampshire is criss-crossed by two major highways, I-89 and U.S. Route 4.

From Central and Western Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York and points south and west: Take I-91 north, through Massachusetts into Vermont. I-91 in Vermont follows the New Hampshire - Vermont border along the Connecticut River. It intersects with I-89 at White River Junction, Vt., near Lebanon, N.H. Since the Dartmouth region borders on Vermont, there are state highways that cross the Connecticut River into New Hampshire that would be convenient, depending on the ultimate destination.

From Eastern Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and points south and east: Take I-93 north through Massachusetts and into New Hampshire. In Concord, pick up I-89 north into the Dartmouth - Lake Sunapee region.

From Northern New Hampshire, Northern Vermont and points north: I-91 and I-93 both head near the region. Travelers can use I-91 in Vermont as a conduit, and take numerous roads over the border into the Dartmouth region. The most direct route from I-93 is NH State Route 104 west.

I-89 passes through and near Warner, Sunapee, Lake Sunapee, New London, Lebanon and Hanover, before crossing into Vermont.

U.S. Route 4 takes travelers into Andover, Danbury, Canaan, Enfield and Lebanon.

NH Route 11 runs east - west between Claremont and Andover, passing through Sunapee, Lake Sunapee and New London, and near Goshen.

Auto Routes to the Monadnock Region

Getting to the Monadnock by Car

The Monadnock Region is in the southwestern part of New Hampshire, with Vermont to the west, the Merrimack Valley to the east, the Dartmouth - Lake Sunapee region to the north, and Massachusetts to the south.

I-91 runs very closely to the Monadnock region, just over the border in Vermont. It should be noted, however, that the best way to see the area is a slow, leisurely drive on New Hampshire's scenic state highways.

From Central and Western Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York and points south and west: Take I-91 north, through Massachusetts into Vermont. I-91 follows the New Hampshire - Vermont border, and intersects with NH Route 9 outside of Brattleboro, VT. Take Route 9 into the Monadnock Region.

From Eastern Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and points south and east: Take I-93 north through Massachusetts and into New Hampshire. At Manchester, pick up NH Route 101 into the Monadnock Region.

From Northern New Hampshire, Northern Vermont and points north: Take I-93 south into Concord. At Concord, pick up NH Route 9, which runs through the Monadnock region into Keene.

Route 9 is a meandering road, which passes through Spofford, Keene, Stoddard and Hillsborough.

Route 101 heads east from Keene, passing through Marlborough, Dublin, Peterborough and Wilton.

U.S. Route 202 heads north - south, passing through Rindge, Jaffrey, Noone, Peterborough, Hancock, Antrim and Hillsborough.